Please, web font vendors, learn how to use CSS @font-face properly!

This has been bugging me for years and I can’t believe it’s still happening.

Being able to use custom fonts has been a huge boon to web design. And font hosting services like Typekit (sorry, I will never call it Adobe Fonts) and Google Fonts make using custom fonts easy.

But sometimes you still buy a font license that involves hosting the font files directly on your own server, and that’s where things get absolutely maddening because, for some reason, someone early on grossly misinterpreted how to use @font-face and that error has been perpetuated by countless unthinking others.

(Yes, I’m being harsh. But this is really not that complicated. And getting it right makes writing your CSS and HTML so much easier.)

Here’s an example of some font-specifying CSS you might receive from a font vendor:

@font-face {
    font-family: 'Font-Name-Regular';
    src: url('Font-Name/Font-Name-Regular.woff2') format('woff2'),
         url('Font-Name/Font-Name-Regular.woff') format('woff');
    font-weight: normal;
    }
.Font-Name-Regular {
    font-family: 'Font-Name-Regular';
    }

@font-face {
    font-family: 'Font-Name-Regular';
    src: url('Font-Name/Font-Name-Regular-Italic.woff2') format('woff2'),
         url('Font-Name/Font-Name-Regular-Italic.woff') format('woff');
    font-weight: normal;
    font-style: italic;
    }
.Font-Name-Regular-Italic {
    font-family: 'Font-Name-Regular';
    font-style: italic;
    }

@font-face {
    font-family: 'Font-Name-Bold';
    src: url('Font-Name/Font-Name-Bold.woff2') format('woff2'),
         url('Font-Name/Font-Name-Bold.woff') format('woff');
    font-weight: normal;
    }
.Font-Name-Bold {
    font-family: 'Font-Name-Bold';
    }

@font-face {
    font-family: 'Font-Name-Bold';
    src: url('Font-Name/Font-Name-Bold-Italic.woff2') format('woff2'),
         url('Font-Name/Font-Name-Bold-Italic.woff') format('woff');
    font-weight: normal;
    font-style: italic;
    }
.Font-Name-Bold-Italic {
    font-family: 'Font-Name-Bold';
    font-style: italic;
    }

This is, in fact, the exact code I just received yesterday from a font vendor when I purchased a license, with the actual font name removed to protect the guilty innocent.

What’s so bad about this, you might ask? Aside from the conventions I dislike of indenting the closing } and using 4 spaces instead of tabs, there are two glaring problems with this:

  1. Because the font-family name defined for each weight and style is different, when you go to use this font, you need to specify the font-family every time you want to use bold or italics in your HTML, or at least use the custom CSS classes defined here. No! No no no! You should not have to apply a class to get bold or italics to render properly. The <strong> and <em> tags should do that on their own!
  2. Don’t f***ing define a bold font with font-weight: normal;! If you don’t realize from this, alone, that something is wrong with your approach, stop coding right now.

So, how should this be done, you ask?

Well, it’s simple. Each @font-face declaration has four properties. One is src: which tells the browser where to find the correct font file(s) for this face. The other three properties work together to define the context in which this particular src should be used: any time this combination of font-family, font-weight and font-style come together.

You can use the same font-family in different @font-face declarations as long as font-weight and font-style are different. In fact, you’re supposed to! That’s the way it’s designed to work!!!

When you do this properly, you don’t need any custom CSS classes. Try this on for size:

@font-face {
    font-family: 'Font-Name';
    src: url('Font-Name/Font-Name-Regular.woff2') format('woff2'),
         url('Font-Name/Font-Name-Regular.woff') format('woff');
    font-weight: normal;
}

@font-face {
    font-family: 'Font-Name';
    src: url('Font-Name/Font-Name-Regular-Italic.woff2') format('woff2'),
         url('Font-Name/Font-Name-Regular-Italic.woff') format('woff');
    font-weight: normal;
    font-style: italic;
}

@font-face {
    font-family: 'Font-Name';
    src: url('Font-Name/Font-Name-Bold.woff2') format('woff2'),
         url('Font-Name/Font-Name-Bold.woff') format('woff');
    font-weight: bold;
}

@font-face {
    font-family: 'Font-Name';
    src: url('Font-Name/Font-Name-Bold-Italic.woff2') format('woff2'),
         url('Font-Name/Font-Name-Bold-Italic.woff') format('woff');
    font-weight: bold;
    font-style: italic;
}

Aside from the fact that this eliminates 1/3 of the lines of code, it also will make your HTML much cleaner and more properly separates content from styling.

Here’s an example of some HTML you might have to write using the first approach:

<p class="Font-Name-Regular">This is some regular text, which also
includes a bit of <em class="Font-Name-Regular-Italic">italics</em>
and even a dash of <strong class="Font-Name-Bold">bold</strong>.</p>

Now, granted, my version does require you to define the font-family for your <p> tags in your CSS file. But guess what… you’re supposed to do that! Put this in your CSS:

p { font-family: 'Font-Name'; }

With that in place, the proper HTML for the same appearance becomes this:

<p>This is some regular text, which also
includes a bit of <em>italics</em>
and even a dash of <strong>bold</strong>.</p>

So, again… when thinking about @font-face, just remember these two simple things:

  1. All @font-face declarations for the same font family should have the same font-family. (Seems kind of obvious when I put it that way, doesn’t it?)
  2. The value for font-weight should be the actual weight of the font. Only the “regular” weight should have font-weight: normal; or font-weight: 400;. If you’re using font-weight: normal; on a bold font, you’ve done something wrong.

This change makes for cleaner code, easier maintenance, and proper separation of content from design.

Addendum

Shortly after I posted this, I went back and looked at the unnamed font vendor’s sample page, because I knew it referenced “the @font-face standard since 2017”. I could not believe that this approach was actually a “standard,” so I tracked down the source, an article Bram Stein published on A List Apart in 2017 called Using Webfonts.

Guess what… Bram Stein’s examples do it the right way!

I do know one place where I’ve consistently seen this wrong way I’m railing against… it’s the code generated on FontSquirrel (no link, on principle) whenever you download a font. Other “web font generator” sites like FontSquirrel probably do it to. They’re all wrong… but Bram Stein isn’t. Don’t drag him down with this bad code!

Hey look, new fonts

I’m sure by the time you read this, 5 years from now, I will have changed things 8 to 10 times since writing this, but as of right now… hey, look. Same old site design, but with new fonts!

One new font, actually: Work Sans, in three weights. It’s a great new, no-nonsense but aesthetically pleasing sans serif font that is free which makes it extra nice. (Though I do not begrudge font designers the right to compensation for their work.)

This one initially got my attention by way of a blog post by the great Khoi Vinh. I figured, if he likes it, it’s worth noting.

What’s so Neue about Helvetica?

fonts
So, I was just reading Rani Molla’s post on GigaOM called What’s all the fuss about Apple and Helvetica Neue? and I felt compelled (as I so often do, about so many things) to comment on the issue here.

Contrary to how the GigaOM article seems to frame it, the controversy — the, if you will, fontroversy (I regret it already) — when Apple demoed iOS 7 at WWDC last month was not that they were switching to Helvetica Neue as the iOS 7 system font. It’s that they were switching to Helvetica Neue Ultra Light, a particularly delicate weight of the general Helvetica Neue font family. (I’ve read some things that suggest they’re reversing course on that decision based on developer feedback, but the GigaOM post doesn’t even touch that.)

The fact is, Helvetica Neue has been the iOS system font ever since the introduction of the iPhone 4. When the iPhone was first introduced, it used plain old Helvetica as the system font. But with the introduction of the Retina Display, Apple switched to the slightly more refined Helvetica Neue.

So the concern with iOS 7 is not Helvetica Neue itself — that’s been working out just fine. It’s this extra thin weight of the font, which becomes difficult to read at smaller sizes.

Personally I like Helvetica Neue Ultra Light. I think it continues the trend towards refinement Apple began with the switch to Helvetica Neue itself, and is demonstrated effectively in Cabel Sasser’s animated GIF featured in the GigaOM article. The version using Helvetica Neue Regular feels heavier and clunkier to me. That said, I do understand and appreciate the legibility concerns with Ultra Light at very small sizes.

I’m not sure how this will work itself out. I doubt Apple will switch to a different typeface, though they may increase the weight of the font in the final version of iOS 7. But part of the reason Apple went with Helvetica in the first place is that it’s neutral (at least in principle). It gets out of the way and isn’t distracting. It doesn’t convey any particular personality. It’s a “blank canvas” of a font, which makes it a perfect fit for iOS devices, where the device itself disappears and becomes the app you’re using. Developers don’t have to use the system font in their apps, but a lot of them do, and by keeping the system font as neutral as possible, Apple avoids predisposing apps to a certain personality or style.

This is exactly the opposite of the opinions expressed in the closing of the GigaOM article, and is I think the opposite of Apple’s intentions with the iOS experience. Using a custom font that “reinforces a more distinctive brand voice” would be the equivalent of sticking a big Apple logo on the front of the iPhone. Apple’s branding goes on the back (where it can be an effective marketing tool). It’s never a part of the user experience.

A first look at the Sleep cover art

As usual, I am putting the cart before the horse with my new album, Sleep (which may end up with the title Sleepy Sleep, if I can get over the fact that unless you get the Beach Boys reference and understand the history of this project, it sounds kind of stupid).

This past weekend, my 9-year-old son Fletcher drew a phantasmagorical picture that I knew on sight was the perfect cover illustration for an album whose music probes sleep, dreams and the subconscious. I scanned the image, colorized and further manipulated it in Photoshop (while, I believe, staying true to the spirit and design of the original), and added some type set in the Dickens McQueen font designed by Kyle Fletcher and distributed (for free!) by Chank Fonts. (Full disclosure: I built the current version of the Chank website, with design by Robert Pflaum.)

I think this cover art is looking great, and it is going to inspire me to keep working and finish the album!

Morning cup o’ links

Perhaps it would have been better to make a sausage analogy for these links, rather than a coffee-and-sausage one. But since one of the links is to a post written by Marco Arment, coffee seems appropriate. (Then again, a Google search reveals that I am far from the first person to use the phrase “morning cup o’ links” so maybe I should spend less time worrying about it being a non sequitir and instead worry that I am horribly unoriginal.)

Each morning I start the day by perusing the latest on Twitter and my RSS feeds, and I almost always find something interesting to read. But today was more interesting than most, and simply retweeting the links didn’t seem adequate. Also, some of these links may become topics for discussion on this week’s episode of The Undisciplined Room, so this is your homework.

First up, we have a post on The Verge discussing homeless hotspots at SXSW. This is a topic I’ve been reading about for the past few days, but this post was the first that made me think beyond my gut reaction that this was shameless exploitation.

Next, with a HT to Daring Fireball, and via Marco Arment, we have a look at Curator’s Code and why it’s a bad idea. The evidence has been mounting for me that Maria Popova’s 15 minutes of (borrowed) fame are almost over (especially when I’m reminded of her love of Ayn Rand and Malcolm Gladwell), and Marco helps solidify that thought.

Then we have type designer Mark Simonson (who designed the Proxima Nova font that I use in the Room 34 logo and branding materials) discussing font anachronisms in The Artist. As much as I enjoyed The Artist, issues with the fonts it used (especially straight quotes, and the fact that it used fonts in a lot of places where hand lettering would have been more appropriate) even distracted me, so I can’t imagine what it must be like for someone like Mark Simonson or Chank Diesel. (Full disclosure: I did development work on Chank’s mobile website.)

And finally… Chicago musician and multi-talent Joshua Wentz has just announced the release of the Side 2 EP by Absinthe and the Dirty Floors, one of the many musical projects with which he’s involved. He’s also made a video for each song on the EP, like this: