Internet Explorer and the centered background SVG problem

We are rapidly approaching, I believe, a time when we no longer need to worry about things that don’t work in Internet Explorer.

But we’re not there yet.

I’ve started using SVG images on the web a lot, especially for logos, which I tend to put into a flexible-width container at the top left corner of pages. Which is great, except IE has this annoying habit of resizing the canvas for SVGs to fill the container they’re in. The whole logo appears on the page, and scaled properly… but it’s horizontally centered in the container, rather than flush against the left edge.

There appear to be many possible solutions, but for a solution that is 100% fluid/responsive (that is, it will scale with the container), this does the trick.

It does involve manually editing the SVG code, but it’s simple and you only need to do it once as part of the image prep process. In the <svg> tag, look for the viewbox attribute. It will most likely consist of four numbers… 0 0 followed by the width and height of the canvas. After this attribute, simply add width="x" height="y" with the same x and y values from the viewbox attribute.

It works!

Noted for future reference (by me): How to reset the MySQL root password in Ubuntu 18.04

As a bleeding-edge early adopter, here in June 2018 I am already using Ubuntu 18.04 LTS for new sites I’m setting up for clients. (How daring!)

I ran aground this afternoon with a new server setup, because I couldn’t log into phpMyAdmin as root (or, therefore, as anyone, since I hadn’t set up my own user yet).

All of the old familiar ways I had been trying, and the tutorials I had referred to for at least the past two years, were not working. So then I specifically searched for a solution for Ubuntu 18.04 and found this excellent tutorial.

First off, mysql_secure_installation wasn’t working. That was one of the “old familiar ways” I had already tried thrice. THRICE I TELL YOU!

The key, I think, was these two unexpected lines:

$ sudo mkdir -p /var/run/mysqld
$ sudo chown mysql:mysql /var/run/mysqld

Because that folder didn’t exist and/or didn’t have the proper permissions, some other steps were failing silently or giving error messages that failed to point me in the direction of the actual problem.

The other thing to note is that with the version of MySQL included in Ubuntu 18.04, these are the proper MySQL commands to run:

USE mysql;
UPDATE user SET authentication_string=PASSWORD("linuxconfig.org") WHERE User='root';
UPDATE user SET plugin="mysql_native_password" WHERE User='root';

And it is actually important to run both of those UPDATE commands, because in the tutorial the results displayed show that the first one updated a record for them, while the second didn’t. I had already run the first command (but not the second) in one of my failed updates. So when I ran these, the first one didn’t update any records and the second one did.

How to modify WooCommerce to prevent users from selecting UPS shipping for P.O. Box addresses

Anyone who’s dealt with e-commerce in any capacity probably knows that UPS won’t deliver to P.O. boxes. Well, technically they can’t deliver to P.O. boxes. And apparently they’ll forward packages on to the box owner’s physical address, but they charge a big extra fee to do it. So, you want to avoid it.

Unfortunately, WooCommerce and its UPS Shipping add-on do not account for this, and will accept UPS orders to P.O. box addresses. Not good.

The official WooCommerce developer documentation has an article on how to block P.O. box shipping, but it applies to all shippers. Not what we want.

Also, I’m not sure if the documentation is outdated or what, but their code sample didn’t work for me with the latest version (3.4.3) of WooCommerce, because of the wc_add_notice() function.

I’ve modified the original code to add a check for UPS shipping, and also to use the $errors variable. (I also considered removing the global $woocommerce; line since it seems unnecessary, but I didn’t take the time to test whether or not it’s definitely safe to remove, so I left it in.)

add_action('woocommerce_after_checkout_validation', function($data, $errors) {
  global $woocommerce;
  if (isset($data['shipping_method'][0]) && strpos($data['shipping_method'][0], 'ups') === 0) {
    $address1 = (isset($data['shipping_address_1'])) ? $data['shipping_address_1'] : $data['billing_address_1'];
    $address2 = (isset($data['shipping_address_2'])) ? $data['shipping_address_2'] : $data['billing_address_2'];

    $replace = array(” “, “.”, “,”);
    $address1 = strtolower(str_replace($replace, '', $address1));
    $address2 = strtolower(str_replace($replace, '', $address2));

    if (strstr($address1, 'pobox') || strstr($address2, 'pobox')) {
      $errors->add('shipping', __('Sorry, UPS cannot deliver to P.O. boxes. Please enter a street address or choose another shipping method.' . $datadump, 'woocommerce'));
    }
  }
}, 10, 2);

Important notes:

1. This code may not immediately work for you; I believe the 'ups' string in the conditional line may vary depending on your Shipping Classes settings, so you may need to investigate exactly what values are returned in $data['shipping_method']. Since this code is fired off by an AJAX call, it can be difficult to debug. I was able to crudely debug it by commenting out the conditional, then appending print_r($data) to the error string.

2. This is using an anonymous function, so it won’t work in PHP versions below 5.3. But you’re not using a PHP version that old, are you? ;)

3. The original version checked the address line 1 and the postcode field, rather than address lines 1 and 2. I’ve United States-ified my code because that’s what I needed. If you’re part of the other 95% of the world, you may need to add that back in, with appropriate adjustments to the nested conditional. (I’m not really sure if this issue is as UPS-specific outside the US, so my modifications may not be relevant.)

Getting Google to remove fake hack URLs from its indexes for your site

As a web developer/systems admin, dealing with a hacked site is one of the most annoying parts of the job. Partly that’s on principle… you just shouldn’t have to waste your time on it. But also because it can just be incredibly frustrating to track down and squash every vector of attack.

Google adds another layer of frustration when they start labeling your site with a “This site may be hacked” warning.

A lot of times, this is happening because the hack invented new URLs under your domain that Google indexed, and for various reasons, Google may not remove these pages from its index after it crawls your thoroughly-cleaned site, even though those URLs are no longer there and are not in your sitemap.xml file. This issue may be exacerbated by the way your site handles redirecting users when they request a non-existent URL. Be sure your site is returning a 404 error in those cases… but even a 404 error may not be enough to deter Google from keeping a URL indexed, because the 404 might be temporary.

410 Gone

Enter the 410 Gone HTTP status. It differs from 404 in one key way. 404 says, “What you’re looking for isn’t here.” 410 says, “What you’re looking for isn’t here and never will be again, so stop trying!”

Or, to put it another way…

A quick way to find (some of) the pages on your site that Google has indexed is to head on over to Google (uh, yeah, like you need me to provide a link) and just do an empty site search, like this:

site:blog.room34.com

Look for anything that doesn’t belong. And if you find some things, make note of their URLs.

A better way of doing this is using Google Search Console. If you run a website, you really need to set yourself up on Google Search Console. Just go do it now. I’ll wait.

OK, welcome back.

Google Search Console lets you see URLs that it has indexed. It also provides helpful notifications, so if Google finds your site has been hacked, it will let you know, and even provide you with (some of) the affected URLs.

Now, look for patterns in those URLs.

Why look for patterns? To make the next step easier. You’re going to edit your site’s .htaccess file (assuming you’re using Apache, anyway… sorry I’m not 1337 enough for nginx), and set up rewrite rules to return a 410 status for these nasty, nasty URLs. And you don’t want to create a rule for every URL if you can avoid it.

When I had to deal with this recently, the pattern I noticed was that the affected URLs all had a query string, and each query string started with a key that was one of two things: either a 3-digit hexadecimal number, or the string SPID. With that observation in hand, I was able to construct the following code to insert into the .htaccess file:

# Force remove hacked URLs from Google
RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^([0-9a-f]{3})=
RewriteRule (.*) – [L,R=410]
RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^SPID=
RewriteRule (.*) – [L,R=410]

Astute observers (such as me, right now, looking back on my own handiwork from two months ago) may notice that these could possibly be combined into one. I think that’s true, but I also seem to recall that regular expressions work a bit differently in this context than I am accustomed to, so I kept it simple by… um… keeping it more complicated.

The first RewriteCond matches any query string that begins with a key consisting of a 3-digit hex number. The second matches any query string that begins with a key of SPID. Either way, the response is a 410 Gone status, and no content.

Make that change, then try to cajole Google into recrawling your site. (In my case it took multiple requests over several days before they actually recrawled, even though they’re “supposed” to do it every 48-72 hours.)

Good luck!

Things that should be obvious: Fixing a 404 error on Custom Post Type archive pages after converting WordPress to Multisite

Maybe it’s just hard to find because it’s such an edge case. Or is it?

Here’s the scenario: you’re converting an existing WordPress site that uses Custom Post Types (with archive pages) to Multisite.

Suddenly, when you’ve switched the site, your CPT archive pages return a 404 error.

Check this: insert /blog into the URL, like so…

Old URL

http://example.com/my-cpt-archive

New URL

http://example.com/blog/my-cpt-archive

Does it work? If so, good. If not, I can’t help you. *shrug*

Let’s just assume it does work, and continue…

You see, Multisite inserts /blog into the URL to prevent URL conflicts between the different sites. Problem is, it’s kind of stupid about it, especially if your site is not a “blog” (and despite what the core team thinks, I’m pretty sure most WordPress sites these days are not blogs). It doesn’t do anything to change page URLs, which are just as likely to conflict.

Anyway, there are two things you need to do. First, go to Settings > Permalinks. (Note that /blog has appeared in all of the permalink structures!) Switch to “Default”, save, then switch back to whatever you want it to be and save again. (Note that /blog has disappeared!)

This still isn’t going to fix your CPT archives though. For that you need to go into your functions.php file in your theme, or wherever you are registering the CPTs in your theme/plugin. In the register_post_type() function, you may have 'rewrite' defined, like this:

'rewrite' => array('slug' => 'something'),

Change it to this:

'rewrite' => array('with_front' => false, 'slug' => 'something'),

You’ll need to flush the rewrite rules by temporarily adding flush_rewrite_rules(); in the functions.php file, uploading it, loading a page, and then removing the code and re-uploading the file. Or, you can refresh the Settings > Permalinks page. (Much easier, but I haven’t tested to be 100% sure it works in this case.)